Re-imagining Newcastle

We’ve all read stories about inspiring futuristic designs, innovations and novel concepts via our Facebook and Twitter news feeds. They offer a few moments to re-imagine our everyday lives and the world we live in. Depending on the type of person you are, they could resemble one of your all time social media pet hates, or they could in fact be the reason why you enjoy social media so much. Are you a lover or hater of such posts?

At Victory Gardens, we happen to love them, particularly those sent to us from our supporters. Some recent posts have been as diverse as New York’s planned subterranean park called “The Lowline”, green skyscraper concepts to farming in a box.

Stories like these act as a type of “future gazing”. They give insight into how our modern lives are evolving and where to look for possible solutions to difficult problems such as climate change, increasing urbanisation, and an ageing population.

Thinking and re-imagining might be considered a luxury by many, but it is essential if we are to move forward. At the heart of re-imagining is problem solving, also known as innovation. What do we want our cities to look like in the future? What problems do we face collectively that require an innovative solution? Where is there opportunity to enhance our lives in a meaningful way?

Recently, masters students of The University of Newcastle’s School of Architecture, re-imagined the suburb of Carrington on Newcastle Harbour. Works by Anne Robson, Jason Searle, Kate Endacott, Lachlan Whitford (cover photo) described in great detail possibilities for future urban living in this semi-industrial inner city suburb. Urban and landscape ideas included experimental water remediation through native fauna and flora, new canals and waterways for water-based food markets, a reinstatement of pedestrian bridges, and additional terraforming of the site and foreshore line to mitigate the effects of possible sea-rise and high-tide flooding.

Other works ranged from multi-rise housing for local workers, immigrants and university students, to a park for temporary artisanal markets and outdoor music festivals.

Densifying and occupying the road reserve (work by Emma Spratt, Albert Cordero, Stephen Wolf and Hampus Larsson, Year 1 Masters of Architecture, The University of Newcastle)

Coalfields become harvested forests (Works by Frank Verevakabau, Samuel Morris, Daniel Rivers, Hamish Poole-Smith)

Coalfields become harvested forests (Works by Frank Verevakabau, Samuel Morris, Daniel Rivers, Hamish Poole-Smith)

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Coal loaders become artisan microhousing (Works by Frank Verevakabau, Samuel Morris, Daniel Rivers, Hamish Poole-Smith, Year 1 Masters of Architecture, University of Newcastle)

While all hypothetical, the students projects were created to encourage speculation and debate about the future development of The City of Newcastle. They also tackled questions about regional identity and the increased densification of Australian cities.

On a recent visit to Auckland, two precincts Britomart and the Wynyard Quarter, offered some interesting future-gazing for Novocastrians. Both precincts have been recently transformed into dynamic drivers of economic development for the city.

Britomart is a transport, heritage and urban renewal hub in Auckland’s central business district adding a vital quality to the city while also serving as a successful transport interchange.

Open spaces, interesting streetscapes and pop-up architecture, combined with some of Auckland’s unique heritage buildings, are accessible via a walking street and plaza offering a diverse mix of shops, restaurants, markets, cosy corners and pleasant sitting areas day and night.

Old meets new in the Britomart precinct. Photo courtesy of @britomart

Old meets new in the Britomart precinct. Photo courtesy of @britomart

Beautiful streetscapes and pop-up buildings illuminate at night

Beautiful streetscapes and pop-up shops designed to illuminate at night

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Special pop-up events like this World Cup Cricket grandstand provides a sanctuary for the lunch time crowd.

In August 2011, Auckland’s Wynyard Quarter opened to the public, the first stage of the largest waterfront urban renewal project undertaken in New Zealand. Stage one of the design-led transformation of the reclaimed western waterfront land, affectionately referred to as ‘The Tank Farm’, was six years in the making, the culmination of 35 resource consents, 45 building consents, two district plan changes and a cool $120 million price tag.

The Wynyard Quarter, walk or catch a vintage tram round the loop stopping at the convention centre, restaurants, playgrounds or markets (image courtesy of ideology.co.nz)

The Wynyard Quarter, walk or catch a vintage tram round the loop stopping at the convention centre, restaurants, playgrounds or markets (image courtesy of ideology.co.nz)

Dubbed Auckland waterfront’s ‘cultural and social heart’, the 36-hectare mixed use residential and commercial site features the Gordon Moller-designed Viaduct Events Centre, a new pedestrian bridge linking the eastern side of Viaduct Harbour (Wynyard Crossing), nine new restaurants and bars at North Wharf, a revitalised tree-lined Jellicoe Street and Silo Park, a new inner city park with westward views of Westhaven Marina and the Auckland Harbour.

Playgrounds amidst the silos, a few paces from the harbour

Playgrounds amidst the silos, a few paces from the harbour

The entry point to the Wynyard Quarter, this is the tourist information centre, convention centre to left, fish markets to the right!

The entry point to the Wynyard Quarter, tourist information centre made from containers, fish markets to the left, convention centre to the right!

Silo Park also features the old 35m Golden Bay cement silo recognising the area’s industrial heritage, the historical significance of which is a theme running through the entire Auckland Waterfront Plan, part of the larger Auckland Plan.

There are plenty of examples of successful urban renewal projects out there. We loved what we saw in Auckland for its obvious similarities to Newcastle’s working harbour. We merely happened upon it as accidental tourists with no expectations of the city. Well done to those who have invested in the revitalization, the results are stunning!

Back home and we take a moment to re-imagine the underground reservoir recently opened to the public by Hunter Water. An opportunity to grow food hydroponically in the future perhaps? http://www.theherald.com.au/story/2386476/hunter-water-to-open-historic-city-reservoir-for-tours-photos/

Cover photo: Re-imagining Carrington: Works by The University of Newcastle Masters of Architecture students Anne Robson, Jason Searle, Kate Endacott, Lachlan Whitford from the exhibition ‘Conditions & Speculations: future urban living and density in Newcastle, Australia’ at The Project Space, Renew Newcastle.